Health Dangers of Fluoride in Drinking Water on Fetuses and Infants

Mar 4, 2009 by

Health Dangers of Fluoride in Drinking Water on Fetuses and Infants

We have been told for years that having fluoride in our drinking water is good for us, in particular our teeth. Without fluoride, we are told, our teeth will decay and fall out.

How true are these assertions? And what about the health dangers of fluoride? The authorities barely speak about that. If you wish to take responsibility for the purity of your drinking water supplies and the health of your family, read the following article on the potential negative effects of fluoride, in particular on fetuses and infants.

Fluoride in Drinking Water may Negatively Affect Health of Fetuses and Infants

by Reuben Chow

Did you know that fluoride in our water supplies is the only chemical added for a specific medical purpose, i.e. to prevent tooth decay? All other chemicals are added for treatment purposes, to improve the quality and safety of tap water. And an expert has voiced his concerns over the potential negative impact of fluoride in drinking water on the health of fetuses and infants.

Dr Vyvyan Howard is a medical pathologist and toxicologist, and also President of the International Society of Doctors for the Environment. In a short video clip put together by the Fluoride Action Network, he expressed his concern over the use of fluoride in our water supplies.

About Dr Howard

Over the last two to three decades, Dr Howard’s research has centered on the effects of toxic substances on the development of fetuses and infants. This, of course, is a period of life whereby one is particularly vulnerable to certain external effects.

So, how was Dr Howard’s attention first drawn to fluoride? According to him, it was the “very very low levels” of the chemical found in human breast milk. This, he said, is due to a mechanism developed in the course of evolution, specifically for keeping the substance away from developing infants.

“Nature has devised a system for keeping fluoride away from the infant, and we are circumventing that by putting fluoride into drinking water, and I think there are consequences,” he said.

What consequences? According to Dr Howard, fluoride is a developmental toxin. More specifically, it is a neurotoxin, and it may also affect the intelligence of the child. While the evidence may not yet be clear-cut, there do seem to be strong indications.

Further, Dr Howard said that other studies have shown the possible ability of fluoride to affect hormonal systems and endocrine systems. In particular, it can influence thyroid levels, and that can have an impact on the IQ in children who are in the development phase.

When thyroid levels are measured in the mother, being at the upper limit of the normal range of thyroid and being at the lower limit of the normal range brings about a difference in intelligence in the offspring. Where thyroid levels are concerned, we are thus “tinkering with quite a sensitive system”.

About Water Fluoridation

Should fluoride be added to our water supplies? Dr Howard was quite clear about what he felt.

“So, the evidence is out there for us to have to say that we got to be very careful. And my opinion is that there isn’t a satisfactory one dose fits all solution through treating our population via tap water. There are going to be some members of that population which will be more disadvantaged than others, and they will obviously include the fetus and the infant, but at the other end of life, people who have got marginal kidney function will be more susceptible. And therefore, I don’t think, on a precautionary basis, that we should be continuing the fluoridation of drinking water supplies,” he said.

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